New IRS Changes for Retirement Plans in 2019

Growth in 2019

 

The IRS announced last month in November cost-of-living adjustments to limits on contributions to retirement plans for 2019. There hasn’t been an increase in some plan types since 2013, which is why now is a great time to take advantage of maximizing retirement contributions. According to a 2017 FINRA study,  10% of American retirement savers are contributing the maximum allowed. Are you?

Here’s the breakdown of the 2019 IRS changes for retirement plans:

  • 401(k)s, 403(b)s, most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan will rise to $19,000 next year, up from $18,500 in 2018.
  • IRA contributions (Pre-Tax, Roth, or a combo) rose to $6,000 from $5,500, the limit that has been in place since 2013.
  • Catch-up contribution limits if you’re 50 or older in 2019 remains unchanged at $6,000 for workplace plans and $1,000 for IRAs.
  • SEP IRA or a solo 401(k) goes up from $55,000 in 2018 to $56,000 in 2019, based on the amount they can contribute as an employer, as a percentage of their salary. The compensation limit used in the savings calculation also goes up from $275,000 in 2018 to $280,000 in 2019.
  • SIMPLE retirement accounts goes up from $12,500 in 2018 to $13,000 in 2019. The SIMPLE catch-up limit is still $3,000.
  • Defined Benefit Plans goes up from $220,000 in 2018 to $225,000 in 2019. 
  • Deductible IRA Phase-Outs for taxpayers making contributions to a traditional IRA is phased out for singles and heads of household who are covered by a workplace retirement plan and have modified adjusted gross incomes (AGI) between $64,000 and $74,000. For married couples filing jointly, in which the spouse who makes the IRA contribution is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the income phase-out range is $103,000 to $123,000 for 2019.
  • Roth IRA Phase-Outs for taxpayers making Roth IRA contributions is $193,000 to $203,000 for married couples filing jointly. For singles and heads of household, the income phase-out range is $122,000 to $137,000.

If you aren’t contributing the maximum into these types of retirement accounts, you can increase what you’re contributing overall. If you have questions about these increases or want meet regarding your overall saving and investing, now is the time to plan for 2019.

 

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*Advisory services offered through Trajan Wealth, L.L.C., an SEC-registered investment adviser. 

*These links are being provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only; they do not constitute an endorsement or an approval by Trajan Wealth, L.L.C., of any of the products, services or opinions of the corporation or organization or individual. Trajan Wealth, L.L.C., bears no responsibility for the accuracy, legality or content of the external site or for that of subsequent links. Contact the external site for answers to questions regarding its content.

Tolerate the Turbulence

Volatility will always be around on Wall Street, and as you invest for the long term, you must learn to tolerate it. Rocky moments, fortunately, are not the norm.

Since the end of World War II, there have been dozens of Wall Street shocks.

Wall Street has seen 56 pullbacks (retreats of 5-9.99%) in the past 73 years; the S&P index dipped 6.9% in this last one. On average, the benchmark fully rebounded from these pullbacks within two months. The S&P has also seen 22 corrections (descents of 10-19.99%) and 12 bear markets (falls of 20% or more) in the post-WWII era.1

Even with all those setbacks, the S&P has grown exponentially larger. During the month World War II ended (September 1945), its closing price hovered around 16. At this writing, it is above 2,750. Those two numbers communicate the value of staying invested for the long run.2

This current bull market has witnessed five corrections, and nearly a sixth (a 9.8% pullback in 2011, a year that also saw a 19.4% correction). It has risen roughly 335% since its beginning even with those stumbles. Investors who stayed in equities through those downturns watched the major indices soar to all-time highs.1

As all this history shows, waiting out the shocks may be highly worthwhile.

The alternative is trying to time the market. That can be a fool’s errand. To succeed at market timing, investors have to be right twice, which is a tall order. Instead of selling in response to paper losses, perhaps they should respond to the fear of missing out on great gains during a recovery and hang on through the choppiness.

After all, volatility creates buying opportunities. Shares of quality companies are suddenly available at a discount. Investors effectively pay a lower average cost per share to obtain them.

Bad market days shock us because they are uncommon.

If pullbacks or corrections occurred regularly, they would discourage many of us from investing in equities; we would look elsewhere to try and build wealth. A decade ago, in the middle of the terrible 2007-09 bear market, some investors convinced themselves that bad days were becoming the new normal. History proved them wrong.

As you ride out this current outbreak of volatility, keep two things in mind:

One, your time horizon. You are investing for goals that may be five, ten, twenty, or thirty years in the future. One bad market week, month, or year is but a blip on that timeline and is unlikely to have a severe impact on your long-run asset accumulation strategy. Two, remember that there have been more good days on Wall Street than bad ones. The S&P 500 rose in 53.7% of its trading sessions during the years 1950-2017, and it advanced in 68 of the 92 years ending in 2017.3

Sudden volatility should not lead you to exit the market.

If you react anxiously and move out of equities in response to short-term downturns, you may impede your progress toward your long-term goals.  Please reach out to us to review your portfolio and goals in today’s market.

 

Contact Us for a Portfolio Review

*Advisory services offered through Trajan Wealth, L.L.C., an SEC-registered investment adviser. 

*These links are being provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only; they do not constitute an endorsement or an approval by Trajan Wealth, L.L.C., of any of the products, services or opinions of the corporation or organization or individual. Trajan Wealth, L.L.C., bears no responsibility for the accuracy, legality or content of the external site or for that of subsequent links. Contact the external site for answers to questions regarding its content.

 

Citations

  1.  marketwatch.com/story/if-us-stocks-suffer-another-correction-start-worrying-2018-10-16 [10/16/18]
  2.  multpl.com/s-p-500-historical-prices/table/by-month [10/18/18]
  3. crestmontresearch.com/docs/Stock-Yo-Yo.pdf [10/18/18]

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